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08/11/2012

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twitter.com/davecormier

As blogging is dead I only read the title of this page in twitter... and I disagree entirely.

Also, this comment is disrupting education. (looks around for keg party)

Dougclow

Technologies don't rarely die, they never die. Or at least, almost never die. They might well reduce substantially in occurrence, but not vanish entirely. Kevin Kelly made the strong claim here (no species of technology has ever gone globally extinct), and someone challenged him - and he won handily.

The fax is a good example. It's not dead! There are at least two working faxes in our office right now. I had to send one just eighteen months ago. And I'm fairly confident they're still in fairly widespread use in Japan.

Dave - is your keg party an open one?

Dkernohan

I kind of imagine Brian like this now...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xpc0s9FsA1Q

Drnickpearce

Funnily enough i was recorded by a couple of guys who were producing a podcast for the ESRC, and they recorded onto a minidisk! i had thought the minidisk was dead, zombie technology, back from the grave :-)

twitter.com/cogdog

The only thing that is every truly dead is saying that something is dead (and Dave Cormier's snark is dead too).

I am glad @Dougclaw mentioned Kevin Kelly's quest to locate items from a random page in an 1989 Montgomery Ward catalog - the entire page of some pretty obscure items were still available somewhere in the world
http://www.kk.org/thetechnium/archives/2006/02/immortal_techno.php

Down with slogans! Down with slogans! (repeat after me...)

mweller

@Doug - you are quite right. I panicked trying to think of a dead technology! I suppose while it's true you can always find one old lady in Wisconsin who still uses her 1902 technology X (you see I'm not even going to suggest one as you'll tell me "actually 10 million people use that regularly in Bangladesh"), some technologies become practically dead. But yes, my wider point was exactly this, that technologies adapt. Analogue photography is a good example, a simplistic review would be analogue is dead, digital is now king (after all how many of us take a film in to be developed). But, as you know, there is a flourishing interest in analogue amongst photographers, and the polaroid type camera is also making a comeback.
@Nick - wow, minidisk! Owen Stephens suggested floppy disk would have been a better dead example, but I bet there are some people who still cherish their pile of disks.
@Alan - quite right, and great link, thanks. I should've been braver and said technology never dies. You are wrong in one respect though - when we are all long dead and gone, Dave Cormier's snark will still patrol the internet...

D

Welcome to my website:http://www.joyfax.com

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